Live Music – Pittsburgh vs The Cotton Club

Considering how small the Pittsburgh lindy hop scene is, we have some great live music here. Last year I saw the Preservation Jazz Hall Band at the Byham Theater and they rocked my world. Juan Villafane and I went, tapped along to the music, danced in the walkways, and had a blast. This week the Boilermaker Jazz Band is playing for three nights (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday) here in Pittsburgh and next week the Cangelosi Cards will be playing at Steel Town Stomp September 16th. Woohoo!! Some great live music here in Pittsburgh. Come out and support!!!

That being said, modern day Pittsburgh has nothing on the Savoy (but then again, who does??). Here is a newspaper article from the 30’s I found.  It reads “Savoy Shatters Own Record “, from the Wednesday 5th of October 1932 edition of the New York Amsterdam News. The article is below. Read it and try to image getting to hear all four bands live. In one ballroom. On one day. Wow.

Savoy Shatters Its Own Record

Four-Band Attraction Drew Thousands to Lenox Ave “Palais de Danse”

The Savoy Ballroom, 140th and 14st streets, shattered a long standing attendance record last Saturday night, when 4,600 spectators are said to have attended the four-band breakfast dance.

As early as 11 o’clock police reserves were called upon to maintain order among the thousands who were massed in the street awaiting admission.

The previous attendance record of 3,716 was created by Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians over two years ago, and this mark remained intact until last Saturday night when a combination of four bands, Cab Calloway, Fletcher Henderson, Chick Webb and the New Orleans Feet Warmers smashed this record.

The “Three Keys,” radio’s newest entertainment sensations, make their first personal appearance athe Savoy Wednesday night, October 12. For the past three months, the Three Keys have been heard four times weekly on the NBC WJZ coast to coast network.

This unique trio present entertainment that is absolutely original – not an imitation, and are acclaimed as creators of a new mode of harmonizing – unnamed because it is new and known only to Bon-Bon, Slim and Bob, the Three Keys, who originated their own style from the rhythm of the old South and the modern melodies of Harlem and Tin Pan Alley.