Pamela Gaizutyte on Competing and Judging

Pamela has been dancing since she was 5 years old. She did traditional Lithuanian folk dancing for years, until she found her passion in Lindy Hop at the age of sixteen. In 2009, she began working at Hoppers’ Dance Studio in her hometown of Vilnius, Lithuania, where she surrounds herself with rhythm on a daily basis as she practices, performs, and teaches Lindy Hop and vernacular jazz.

Pamela Gaizutyte is one of the most exciting followers to burst onto the international swing scene in recent years. Her creativity, personal style and sense of musicality are an inspiration. Pamela enjoys spreading the joy of dance and sharing her knowledge, and is excited to travel to new and faraway places to do so.

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

 
Name: Pamela Gaizutyte
Home base: Vilnius, Lithuania
Facebook: here
Year you started competing: 2009 (started dancing 2008)
Approx how many competitions have you competed in: 30-50
 
 

Competing

* Why do you compete?
Sometimes I compete just to make myself practice as it pushes me to challenge myself and work on something (anything). Other times it’s so that I have an opportunity to create something with another person. I find that in the Lindy Hop World, the average dancer doesn’t have a lot of performance opportunities in order to make a name for themselves or get recognized with a partner, so that’s where competition comes in.
 
* Why do you think competition is valuable?
Competing is valuable because it makes you work through a stressful situation. This is a great way to see how your body moves naturally or under pressure. You get to see your true skills, strengths, and flaws. It’s also a great place to get experience. Hmmm….what else? You could win some things like an event ticket! I used to do that: I would borrow money from my family and friends so that I could compete in the hopes that I might win a ticket to another event, and then I would only need to get myself there and find a place to stay! 
 
* What’s your personal philosophy on J&Js?
I’ll be there for my partner, for sure. It’s not only “social dancing,” so it’s not time to challenge my partner and surprised them. For example, let’s say my partner and I are dancing for the first time in a competition. I’ll try to calm down if they don’t have a lot of experience and really be there for them. But if I know what to expect because I’ve already danced with that Leader before, I don’t change my dancing – I still will style and takespace when I can.
 
Partner first, music second, self third, and audience fourth.
 
* Do you still get nervous before a competition?
Oh my goodness, I used to getnervous; I couldn’t control my limbs! So yeah, I used to, and it would make me feel ill. I finally said to myself, “If I am going to be nervous like that again, then I will not perform or compete.” I want to have a fun time, not make myself sick!
 
Hahah, I have even thrown up after a performance before! That’s how nervous I’ve been before.
 
In the past, I have done a bad job performing and that made me really upset. I had to ask myself why was I put myself in a position if it wasn’t pleasurable. And then I stopped being nervous. Now I appreciate performing and competing much more.
 
* How do you deal with nerves before a competition?
I talk to myself before I head out to the competition dance floor by reminding myself the reasons why am I dancing. Mainly, I tell myself that I am sharing my experience, and that helps ground me.
 
* What competition have you done that meant the most to you? Why?
ESDC Solo Jazz (2015) was the most meaningful. It was me, Tatiana Udry, and the boys. At that moment I felt like I wanted to show whatever I was feeling in that moment with my dancing. I knew that it might not be very aesthetic to watch, but that was not the most important thing to me. Dancing “me” was the most important, and I did that. I was really proud of myself.
 
On a side note, I would like to see equal or more gals compete in solo jazz competitions AND be recognized for their work! Sometimes it feels like some of the gals are not willing to push themselves when they compete and I really want them to push harder and go beyond their comfort zone.
 
* What is/was your favorite competition to watch?
Probably J&J because that’s where the most magic can happen!
 
* Three pieces of advice to give to the next up-and-coming competitors?
     1) Be ok with the level you’re at. Enjoy where you are.
     2) Question everything as that’s the best way to learn.
     3) Dance with confidence in yourself, and then you will leave no space to be judged.
 

Judging

* What do you enjoy about judging?
Focusing on the dancers, paying more attention to what’s happening with their bodies, connection, and rhythms.
 
* What do you dislike about judging?
Sometimes it’s tough to choose placements or criterias that guides you through what you wanna see in the dance.
 
* As a judge, what are you looking for in a Routine?
Attitude, personality, musical choices/interpretations.
 
* As a judge, what are you looking for in a Strictly?
Equality, conversation between partners, and solid connection (in the meaning that as they are partners they understand each others’ dancing).
 
* As a judge, what are you looking for in a J&J?
Generosity, attention to each other, move/rhythm suggestions, like a call and response.
 
* What do you think are the biggest misconceptions about routines/strictly’s/J&J?
That placement kinda guides you or reveals what kind of dancer you are. 
 
* Three pieces of advice to give to the next up-and-coming competitors?
     1) Just dance like you are social dancing or they way you do in rehearsal and try to remember that feeling.
     2) Find something you’d like to emphasize something when you perform or compete –  like slides or dancing more on rhythm section – getting inspired by your partners footwork. If that doesn’t speak to you, then maybe choose an emotion before you go out onto the stage and “be” that.
     3) Listen to the music – it has many many answers and suggestions.
 
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To me, Pamela embodies pure joy when she dances. She has that rare ability to let go of the world around her and exist in the flow of the music and the power of her movement. I don’t have a clear memory of the first time I saw her, but I always remember knowing that she had “it” and that she was going to be a force in the Lindy World, if she wanted to be. It’s been a pleasure to see how she’s matured in her career; training and teaching with multiple partners, becoming a road warrior, finding her voice, and most recently creating a shoe company.
#soproud